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NEW SOCIETY BLOG

Introduction to Green Roofs

In Essential Green Roof Construction, Leslie Doyle provides step-by-step instructions to build a green roof. By blending common sense with beauty, a green roof is a system of layers that work together to support plant life, insulate homes, and make the world a greener place. Today, Leslie introduces green roofs in an excerpt shared from her book, Essential Green Roof Construction.

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Thinking in Systems and Channeling Systemic Change

All across North America, severe weather events have become a common occurrence. Extreme heat, drought, flash floods, cold snaps, hurricane bombs, and many more are becoming regular seasonal changes. If you’re struggling to explain these events to your kids or feeling angst amidst climate change, Harriet Shugarman might be able to help. In her book, How to Talk to Your Kids About Climate Change, she provides tools and strategies for parents to explain the climate emergency to their children and galvanize positive action. Today we look at how thinking in systems and channelling systemic change can be a catalyst for a better future.

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Focusing On Regeneration and Collective Good

Much of the last few years has been talking about getting back to normal. But what if we strived to get back to something better than what we had? In The Edible Ecosystem Solution, Zach Loeks provides a practical guidebook that looks at underutilized spaces to reveal the many opportunities for landscape transformation that are both far-reaching and immediately beneficial and enjoyable.

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How well do you know the most popular tree of the season?

How much do you know about pine trees? In Growing Conifers, John Albers and David Perry share extensive information on identifying, selecting, and cultivating conifers. Today, we share an excerpt from the book on the 12 of the most commonly seen pine genera.

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The World Unmasked

For many people the COVID-19 pandemic turned the world upside down and unrecognizable in a matter of weeks. For John Restakis, it only accelerated the existing trends of rising inequality, deep political polarization, and the pervasive power of corporations. In his book, Civilizing the State, Restakis explains the contemporary and historical contexts of the liberal state. He reimagines it, not as a handmaid to predatory elites but as a partner state that promotes equity, economic democracy, co-operation, and human thriving, driven by deep democracy and a fully sovereign civil society.

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Navigating Sexism and Benefiting from White Privilege

In What’s Up With White Women? Ilsa Govan and Tilman Smith explore their gendered roles in systemic racism and the opportunities for action. Positioned between white men and BIPOC, white women are in a unique place of the power hierarchy. Today, in an excerpt from their book, we share their thoughts on navigating sexism and benefitting from white privilege.

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A Slowly Warming Sun

In A Brief History of the Earth's Climate: Everyone's Guide to the Science of Climate Change, Steven Earle provides an accessible answer to why human-caused global warming and climate change is different from the natural evolution of the Earth's climate. Today, we share an excerpt of his book on how the first theories of a habitable planet became possible.

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Interview with Lloyd Alter

Today’s blog features an interview with Lloyd Alter, author of Why Individual Climate Action Matters More than Ever. It includes the winning question from the giveaway!

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Achieving Racial Justice and Equity Requires Conversation

Today, Fern Johnson and Marlene Fine share stories that didn’t rise to national attention. How many of these were you aware of?

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Why You Can Grow Figs In Cold Climates

For some, the taste of a fresh, juicy fig brings memories of travel to warm, faraway places. However, if you live in a colder region - it’s possible to enjoy figs grown on your own property. In Growing Figs in Cold Climates: A Complete Guide, Lee Reich provides methods for cultivating figs in cold regions. Today, Lee explains why it’s entirely possible to grow figs in cold climates.

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What Does ‘Climate Hypocrite’ Even Mean?

Self-confessed eco-hypocrite Sami Grover says we should do what we can in our own lives, but then we need to target those actions to create systemic change. Today, we share an excerpt from We’re All Climate Hypocrites Now: How Embracing Our Limitations Can Unlock the Power of a Movement on what Sami means when he uses the term hypocrite.

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Understanding Power

For much of Richard Heinberg’s adult life, he’s been bothered by the questions of is it possible that we humans, or at least some of us, now enjoy too much of a good thing? Or is our problem merely that we don’t understand power very well and, therefore, misuse it? Today, he explores these questions and provides context for how we can better understand power.

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Introduction to Power by Richard Heinberg

Richard Heinberg’s latest title, Power is an exploration of humanity's power over nature and the power of some people over others. Power traces how four key elements developed to give humans extraordinary power: tool making ability, language, social complexity, and the ability to harness energy sources — most significantly, fossil fuels. Today, we take an excerpt from Power that explains how Richard started on the journey of writing this book.

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Individual Climate Action Does Make a Difference

How do we adapt our lives to reduce our carbon footprint? In Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, Lloyd Alter reveals the carbon costs of everything we do and provides practical tips for making significant reductions and not sweating the small stuff. Today on the blog, we take an excerpt from Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, where Lloyd explains how various forms of food waste impact our carbon footprint.

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The Footprint of Food Waste

How do we adapt our lives to reduce our carbon footprint? In Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, Lloyd Alter reveals the carbon costs of everything we do and provides practical tips for making significant reductions and not sweating the small stuff. Today on the blog, we take an excerpt from Living the 1.5 Degree Lifestyle, where Lloyd explains how various forms of food waste impact our carbon footprint.

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